Data Mashups and the Future of Mapping (PDF link, 14mb), a new JISC ‘Horizon Scanning’ report. The Sept 2010 report is a useful gallop through the various technologies, and points to the duller-but-noticeable-on-ejournal-databases variety of academic research (Christian Nold is not mentioned). On page 40 the report briefly…

“explains why the education community needs to understand the issues around how to open up data, how to create mash-ups that do not compromise accuracy and quality and how to deal with issues such as privacy and working with commercial and non-profit third parties. It also shows how data mash-ups in education and research are part of an emerging, richer information environment with greater integration of mobile applications, sensor platforms, e-science, mixed reality, and semantic, machine-computable data and speculates on how this is likely to develop in the future.”

Talking of neogeography, the arts side of such technical/cultural practices has recently popped out some interesting examples in London. Riverains… “maps both the imaginary underground world of the Riverains and London’s history onto the urban landscape […] accessible through users’ mobile phones”. There are apparently plans to bring it to Manchester and Nottingham in future. And the London Psychogeophysics Summit merged the London school of psychogeography with the geophysical earth-measurement tools of archaeology.