Archive for October, 2005

Sullivan on the decline of Gaytivity

Given that attracting an initial population of gay men is held by some to feature so strongly in the early development of a city’s creative industries and gentrification process, Andrew Sullivan’s new in-depth TNR essay is timely. “The End of Gay Culture” looks at the link between assimilation, tolerance and the decline of the gay […]

Keepers

Keepers: I bought some old discarded art books from my university library for 50p each, thinking I might sell them on eBay. Of course, I picked the most interesting ones, and now the problem is… well, they’re interesting. And so now I no longer want to sell them. Ever seen the incredible all-wood stave churches […]

Clock of the Long Now

Clock of the Long Now:Discover magazine updates us on where Danny Hillis and Brian Eno are at with their plans to build the “Clock of the Long Now”.

Away days

Away days: I’ve been away from the web for a week. On Monday BT decided that some vital wiring in a remote exchange should go on holiday for a few days. My dial-tone only came back on Friday evening. I used the time to re-install Windows on a new 200GB hard-drive, and then re-install and […]

Nature, the best teacher of design

Nature, the best teacher: A new UK-oriented site for nature-inspired design.

Cluster buster (creative clusters paper)

Cluster buster:The full text of a new paper by Andy Pratt, looking at the soundness of the “creative clusters” concept, the assumptions behind it, and making a tentative stab at suggesting better models. As a by-product, it once again exposes the serious weaknesses we have in the statistics (or lack of them) for the creative […]

Academic games weblog

Gamelog: A useful weblog for academics studying computer games and comics and their markets.

Brain gain for the UK, new report

Brain gain:The Higher Education Policy Institute has just published a major report, Brain Drain: Migration of Academic Staff to and from the UK. The title is somewhat misleading, since they found that arrivals outweight departures. Most of those emigrating are young researchers going to the USA, sharpening their skills but then returning home after a […]

Pronged by Tessa

Pronged by Tessa: The UK’s creative industries are apparently to get “three prongs” from Culture Minister Tessa Jowell. 1) A nannying “focus on education” by the DCMS, to instill an anti-piracy attitude in kids (adults and teens presumably being a lost cause); 2) a DTI “exploring” of the possibility of less red tape in the […]

Old Job, New Job

Old Job, New Job: Careers advice not up to scratch? www.oldjobnewjob.com offers to guide you into newly emerging hybrid professions. The “new careers” on offer are rather jokey futurist forecasting, rather than the new ones that are here now. In 2020 (according to the survey) I may apparently be a “Family Imagineer”, a rather disreputable […]

Business Link revamp (again)

Business Link revamp (again): The sad and sorry Business Link brand continues to wend its way down to the invevitable scrap heap. The switch to running it via local Chambers of Commerce hasn’t been a success, so Advantage West Midlands are breaking with the “one size fits all” area-based approach and are to move to […]

Ronnie Barker

Ronnie Barker: More people watched The Two Ronnies in the last two years than watched The Office and Little Britain combined, which is a heartening thought. The brilliant Ronnie Barker has died, and with his sad loss a whole tradition of English comedy becomes a little dimmer, a little further away. Thankfully we still have […]

Hereford 05

Hereford 05: Redeye reports that the Hereford Photography Festival will run in 2005.

10 years of the mass net

10 years: It’s the 10-year anniversary of the mass consumer take-off of our networked world. The six months to Christmas 1995 saw it all come together: affordable early 486 PCs; a half-decent new operating system called (shudder) Windows 95; a newly-released Netscape 1.2 web browser; and treacle-like 14.4-baud modem access to the fledgling web. Now […]

Arts & Business literature review on business creativity

Handling creatives: The UK’s Arts & Business organisation has released Creativity In Businesses: a literature review. It’s generally uncritical (i.e.: no more than a basic description of Richard Florida’s Creative Class), and it covers the ubiquitiously dodgy “creative leadership for managers” management tomes. But it also offers some guidance on practical books about how managers […]